Aggravated Speeding

aggravated speeding in Illinois

Aggravated Speeding

Aggravated speeding in Illinois is a misdemeanor offense that can be punished by up to one year in jail and a fine of $2,500. Aggravated speeding is defined by 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5.

What’s the Difference Between Aggravated Speeding and Petty Speeding?

Petty speeding tickets are ordinary speeding offenses that can be punished with only a fine. Speeding tickets where the speed is less than 25 miles an hour over the speed limit are petty speeding tickets. Aggravated speeding includes all speeding offense where the speed of the offender’s vehicle is over of 26 miles per hour.

Petty speeding tickets carry with them at most a hefty fine and traffic school. Supervision is a valid sentencing option in petty speeding offenses. However, supervision is not an option in aggravated speeding cases.

What Are the Penalties for Aggravated Speeding?

The sentencing options available for aggravated speeding depend largely upon the actual speed cited in the traffic violation. Aggravated speeding between 26-35 miles per hour is a Class B misdemeanor that is punishable by up to 6 months in jail and a fine of $1,500.

Aggravated speeding in excess of 35 miles per hour is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to a year in jail and a fine of $2,500.

Aside from the criminal penalties that are available for aggravated speeding, a conviction for aggravated speeding also has the potential to cause a suspension or revocation of an offender’s driving privileges.

Conclusion

Aggravated speeding is a serious traffic offense that has the potential to land you in jail or suspend your driver’s license. Jaleel Law P.C. has successfully handled aggravated speeding offenses throughout Chicago, Skokie, Maywood, Markham, Rolling Meadows, Bridgeview, and in Du Page, Lake, Will, Kendall, and Kane counties. If you have been charged with aggravated speeding contact Jaleel Law P.C. we have the experience and the know-how to save your driver’s license and how to protect you from a misdemeanor criminal conviction.